Graduate!

My lack of posting has been due to the many changes I'm undergoing in this exciting time of transition! I graduated in May from Massachusetts College of Art and Design from the fibers department, I could not be happier! MassArt provided me with four amazing years that have easily been the best thus far, I overcame challenges, learned an immense amount and realized what I want to get out of life! As I embark on this new chapter of my life I am excited to see what happens! I have many projects in the works and come fall will begin posting about what I'm making for a soon to be online shop. There will be all sorts of handmade goodies from bags to clothes to other fibers works, stay tuned!

A happy cheer as I cross the stage! Photo credit to Robert Mulak 

A happy cheer as I cross the stage! Photo credit to Robert Mulak 

The Final Collection

Over the course of the semester I have finished my final body of work as a student at MassArt. The following photos are from my thesis show that is currently on exhibit at MassArt, myself and colleague, Emma (www.emmawelty.com), have been working closely for the past three years in the fibers department. We both create work that is primarily location based or inspired, using dyeing or weaving as mediums, because of this our show is named Terroir. If you happen to be in the Boston area stop by MassArt North Crackatorium and take a peak. Below is my artist statement regarding the work. Enjoy!

My work in fibers investigates the personal relationships that I and others have with this material.  Cloth is an integral part of life and has a rich history in many cultures, providing the clothes on our backs and creating an environment in our homes.  Intrigued by this subtle dependence and bond we have with this material, I have been exploring the importance of cloth in my own life as well as others by creating fine hand made textiles that serve as both functional and decorative, adaptable to a variety of audiences.

    Inspired by the culture and architecture of Cuba, combined with interior elements, I am creating handmade textiles that interact with viewers and their given interiors. By using weaving and exploring materiality, I will further investigate how cloth interacts in a space and how viewers react to it in that environment. Pushing material, structure, and display, the cloth will have its own conversation with its surroundings including light, shape, orientation and climate, and in turn will effect viewers experience with the cloth.

    My work explores weaving as a tool for creation and structure as a voice for interaction, as well as making discoveries about the importance of cloth to its audience and environment. With, or without a function, the fabric holds a unique place in an interior leaving audiences to create a conversation with it.

Busy Bee

I've done quite a bit of work since my last post, I wont give everything away right now, but I recently finished a piece I'm thrilled about it. Over the course of a month I dyed a warp, and created a 5 yard waffle weave - for weavers, you know how long it takes. I'm so excited about the results! Photos don't do the piece justice, but the light reflects off it in an iridescent way and it looks different from every angle. In an architectural setting it interacts with light as well as being an out of the ordinary textile for an interior. Here's how the results came out!

 

Still in progress on the loom

Still in progress on the loom

Full yardage fresh off the loom

Full yardage fresh off the loom

Inspired

I finished my copper weaving which is very exciting! It was so delicate and tedious to do but a satisfying result that has inspired me to push the idea further and continue to create interior pieces that interact with the space. Moving away from thinking about the practical and thinking about interiors as a space and how my work can exist within an architectural space. I'm excited to see where this body of art is going and am looking forward to the outcome, a combination of practical work that has a function and work that relies on the space its in outside of the norm. Much more to come!

Completed copper weaving, barely visible from straight on view

Completed copper weaving, barely visible from straight on view

Detail shot of it folded

Detail shot of it folded

Getting inspired by how people play with it!

Getting inspired by how people play with it!

One down and another to come

My dyed warp weaving is complete and ready to become the new upholstery fabric on a chair! My next project has less of a practical use but is a piece that interacts with the environment of an interior, playing with light and air this piece will be a finished piece that is an experiment. If it works successfully I will make more like it on a larger scale. I am using a bamboo warp that is spaced on the loom and a copper thread weft (purchased from Habu Textiles). The copper thread is so thin that it is almost impossible to see what I am doing without the right lighting, this piece will be decorative and subtle capturing light and transparency.

 

Completed weaving, 46" in width, approx. 5 yards long

Completed weaving, 46" in width, approx. 5 yards long


Bamboo and copper weaving in progress. 

Bamboo and copper weaving in progress. 

Weaving in progress

After several weeks of color studies I finally worked out my color palette for my larger scale dyed weavings. All my pieces for this semester are inspired from my trip to Cuba I went on last summer with school, my color palette is directly drawn from the town of Trinidad and I am focusing on having these textiles be for interior settings. This current piece will become the upholstery for a chair. Here are some photos of the process!

 

The warp after I dyed it, washed and dried it. Ready to go on the loom!

The warp after I dyed it, washed and dried it. Ready to go on the loom!

Process shot while weaving, its coming along

Process shot while weaving, its coming along